Posts Tagged ‘Atlanta’

Why we must continue to change

by Bill Chegwidden FAIA, founding principal and president CDH Partners

Gardendale-Sanctuary_AJS_0109b

Forty years ago, I remember being in a worship service where the pastor spoke with a missionary by telephone, who was living on the other side of the world. The conversation was broadcast live and everyone in attendance was amazed by what they heard.

If that same missionary was with us today, he or she would have even more of an opportunity to engage an audience and to become an integral part of the service. Digital technology creates an atmosphere where individuals on the other side of the city, state, country, or world can appear to be on stage in front of us. But the technology doesn’t stop here. It goes far beyond this to a point where a church can become a central point of focus within a community by using various forms of media and communication. It all begins when church leaders ask a very important question: How do we connect the needs of our congregation in today’s evolving digital world? 

Mt.Paransanctflr
For years, churches have looked for effective ways to bridge this growing gap by having a traditional and non-traditional worship services but change has always been hard. Just a few years ago, architects designed churches and worship centers with long narrow hallways, large classrooms, and very few gathering spaces. We’ve moved away from this because we realize that people crave community. They want to worship in churches that provide areas and spaces that encourage interaction and engagement. And they want these areas to be places that are welcoming, bright, and warm. Some contain fireplaces, coffee bars, Wi-Fi, and an atmosphere that is engaging and builds community. They are places where people connect with others. To continue reading this article, please click here.

 

 

 

Is a commercial kitchen right for your church?

By RaeAnn Slaybaugh

Editor’s note: CDH Principal Ernest “Terry” Biglow was recently interview by Church Executive Magazine on the scope of building a commercial kitchen

With equipment, exhaust systems, plumbing, electricity, building codes and so much more to consider — all at a considerable cost — building a commercial church kitchen is a big decision.

But, it’s also a smart one.

Any church that wants to add a commercial kitchen to its campus learns quickly that it’s no small undertaking. Depending on the kitchen’s intended uses, there are a multitude of equipment requirements, liabilities, staffing and inspection considerations to navigate — often, more than the church bargained for.

Commercial, by design
To start with, it can be confusing to decipher the differences between a commercial kitchen and a warming, or residential-style, setup. Because these nuances are subject to local health and fire jurisdictions, they vary greatly across the country.

Church design professionals such as Ernest C. (Terry) Biglow, III, AIA — managing principal at CDH Partners, Inc., in Marietta, GA — are used to leading clients through this complex territory. “For one thing, commercial kitchens are subject to inspections for compliance with the local health department, and the number of meals served might influence the frequency of those inspections,” he explains. “And, on the equipment side, anything more than a microwave could be considered a commercial kitchen, in some areas of the U.S.” Please click here to continue reading.

Video Just Release on New Paulding Hospital!

The new CDH designed Paulding Hospital is the second phase for the 33-acre development located in Hiram, GA. This new hospital opened in April 2014 and has 56 beds and has the capacity for 112 beds. This state-of-the-art hospital is one of the safest in the country. Click here to view the video!

WellStar East Cobb set to open

KidsAreaEdited

The WellStar East Cobb Health Park is set to open on September 15. It was recently spotlighted in the Marietta Daily Journal. For the past few years, WellStar Health System has worked with CDH Partners to provide an innovative delivery to healthcare for area residents. This health park venue offers a variety of out-patient services and wellness opportunities. The vision for these parks is to bring the services closer to the communities which they serve. Each park will become an integral part of the community and be utilized for medical services but also to serve such needs as fitness and health education. To read the MDJ article, please click here.

CDH Partners announces the selection of two new principals

Paulla(Angie's)Web

Paulla Shetterly and Ernest “Terry” Biglow have been named principals at CDH Partners, Inc. In making the announcement, Bill Chegwidden, who is the firm’s president said, “We are pleased to have Paulla and Terry in these positions, and I know they will bring added strength to our team.”

Paulla Shetterly (RID, IIDA, LEED AP, EDAC) who joined the firm in 1997 is also director of the Interior Design Studio. She is an award-winning leader in holistic and evidence based design and was named associate principal in 2007.

Shetterly is also a noted speaker and the author of numerous articles on interior design as it relates to spaces and the environment. She is the recipient of repeated Georgia ASID Awards and has participated in the Antron Award Panel of Judges. At CDH, she directs a multi-discipline design team that is focused on creating distinctive environments. She has an extensive background in interior design and is known for her intuitive ability to produce designs that are well planned for space and quality. She is a graduate of Kansas State University and is a LEED accredited professional.

Terry2Web

Ernest Biglow (AIA), also named principal, directs the Engineering Department at CDH and provides creative oversight that incorporates firm-wide collaboration. He is a seasoned architect and the recipient of numerous awards for projects ranging from healthcare and education to religious design. He is well versed in every discipline of architectural design and leads clients through the master plan process using keen insight, thoughtfulness to detail, and collaboration.

He is a graduate of the University of Florida where he earned a Masters degree in Architectural Design. He joined CDH in 2002 and was named associate principal in 2012. His recognitions include the Sigma Tau Sigma: Honorary Tutoring Society and Phi Kappa Phi: Scholastic Honorary Society.

CDH Partners is consistently one of the top 25 architectural firms in Georgia. It was founded in 1977 as a client-centered firm. Over the years, CDH has repeatedly been recognized as one of the most progressive architectural firms in the state and the southeast.

WellStar Paulding Hospital featured by Heathcare Design

The WellStar Paulding Hospital, which is a CDH design project will be featured at the upcoming HCD September Design Showcase. The project will also be highlighted in the Healthcare Design Showcase Magazine and online. Click here to view this amazing project.

WellStar Pediatric Center Highlighted in Marietta Daily Journal

Editor’s note: The following article recently appeared in the online Marietta Daily Journal. CDH Partners designed the WellStar Pediatric Center, which is located on Barrett Parkway. The facility is scheduled to open on July 7,

When children step into the new WellStar Pediatric Center, they’ll think they walked into the ocean, not a doctor’s office. The 20,000-square-foot pediatric doctor’s office, which cost about $13 million, will open July 7 on Barrett Parkway near Cobb Parkway. The walls are painted light blue and green and the hallways, decorated with bubbles, seaweed and fish, curve through the building like waves.The one-floor building provides an environment that’s fun and inviting for children, said Dr. Avril Beckford, the chief pediatric officer for WellStar Health System and a member of its board.

“Our vision for this center was that a parent could walk in and feel like they were completely at home, and that it’s fun and it’s welcoming,” Beckford said.

Read more: The Marietta Daily Journal – Anything for the kids WellStar will unveil new pediatric center in July

Commercial church kitchens

The following article was recently published in Church Executive Magazine. It contains quotes from CDH principal Ernest C. (Terry) Biglow.

By RaeAnn Slaybaugh

A church considering a commercial kitchen finds out quickly it’s a big undertaking. They must navigate a multitude of equipment and construction requirements, plus liabilities, staffing and inspection considerations.

For starters, it helps to understand the basic differences between a commercial kitchen and a warming (residential-style) setup. Ernest C. (Terry) Biglow, III, AIA — managing principal at CDH Partners, Inc., in Marietta, GA — often leads church clients through this complex territory.

HolySpiritKitchenWeb

 

“Commercial kitchens are subject to inspections for compliance with the local health department, and the number of meals served might influence the frequency of those inspections,” he explains. “On the equipment side, anything more than a microwave could be considered a commercial kitchen in some areas of the U.S.”

On the intended use side of the equation, Eric MacInerney, principal and project architect at Heimsath Architects in Austin, TX, says three kinds of activities put a church kitchen on the health department’s radar as a commercial operation: serving a day school, serving the homeless, and selling food. “These create a situation where there’s public trust in the food.”

Since many churches will want to offer these services, a commercial kitchen becomes the logical choice. Once that decision is made, the issue of vent hoods and exhaust systems isn’t far behind. There’s a reason: They’re expensive — and non-negotiable. Click here to continue reading.

CDH Works on Third Health Park

Recently, the Marietta Daily Journal ran an article featuring the three CDH designed WellStar health parks located in Acworth, East Cobb (currently under construction), and Vinings, which is soon-to-be-built. A fourth heath park is planned for the Cherokee County area.

SideFront

The WellStar Acworth Health Park was one of the first health parks built in Georgia. It was developed to meet the needs of the surrounding community by offering a higher level of patient care in a safe setting. The first two floors of the health park contain physician’s offices, which are leased mostly by doctors within the Medical Group.

This facility quickly became a model for a system-wide approach for community wellness and care. These comprehensive medical facilities offer a full complement of services that includes diagnostic imaging, women’s services, ambulatory surgery, physical therapy, multi-special rehabilitation, urgent care, physicians offices including primary care, OB/GYN, pediatrics, cardiac/Pulmonary, orthopedics, and a sleep center. These facilities are often expandable to include fitness centers, community/education classrooms, childcare, retail shops, and a pharmacy.

D7K_1034CDHSign

Co-mingling of healthcare services and physicians’ offices brings a new level of convenience to residents. Screenings and wellness services are done on site, which means a patient does not have to be sick to access the facility. Designers also create gather spaces where patients and their families can meet, talk, and even rest. These spaces include comfortable seating, water features, and other services that are focused on patient needs and care. (At the right is the East Cobb Health Park, which is currently under construction and is located on Johnston Ferry Road.)

To read more about these CDH designed health parks, please click here.

2013 CDH Chili Cook Off!

CDH Partners recently held its annual Chili Cook Off luncheon.

There were costumes, smiles, and plenty to eat! Awards were given but the greatest reward was the time to be with co-workers and friends!

D7K_1271DressUPGroup
 
D7K_1289ChiliCups
 
Judging all the different chili entries was easy and fun! Judging the best costume was just as much fun.

D7K_1304GreggGuys
 
D7K_1286MelissaEvert
 
D7K_1295Angie
 
D7K_1314Terry
 
D7K_1266RobbieSD
 
Mountain Man and Super Dave!

D7K_1262TheGirls
 
The group from Interiors always finds a way to make a bold statement!

D7K_1310Sara
 
“Rock” of the “Rock, Paper, Scissors” fame below

Erin-Rosie
 
Rosie the Riveter!

Lighting: Key Element in Design

ChapelWeb

Often when clients take the first step in planning a new or renovated space, lighting may not be at the forefront of their thoughts or plans. Other concerns quickly move to the top of the priority list such as design, function, space usage, and budget. Yet in the recesses of their minds, they know lighting plays a key role in the design. It contributes not only to the atmosphere and environment of a space, it aids in wayfinding, safety, and increased work productivity.

When you boil it all down, lighting is a technical art and a science. It is used to make an environment highly appealing and functional. When it is used correctly, lighting provides aesthetical elements that motivate, energize, and even calm those who use a facility. Keep in mind that lighting today is much more efficient and cost effective. Engineers and architects calculate the amount of daylight received in an internal space along with the planned lighting to determine if there is adequate benefit to the lighting design. This calculation combined with other key factors such as surface materials, furniture, paint, and wall textures help to determine the effect lighting will have on a designed space.

So with these entry facts in mind, where should you start in regards to providing a good lighting design? Usually, the best place to start is with the basics and with learning about the various light sources and how they work to create a more productive environment. It is always wise to express your needs and desires up front to the lighting engineer, who will be helping you design your facility.

Oglethorpe Ave Elementary School

It is also important to understand the options you have regarding available lighting fixtures and lamp sources. By planning your design for the right kind of illumination, you’ll have a better understanding of what the space is going to look like when it is completed. Plus, the right lighting makes a tremendous statement about how your building and employees will function and work together.

The following is an overview of lighting sources, fixtures, and even the problems that may need to be addressed with older fixtures. This simple but very important information also answers questions that include: What is the color temperature (Kelvin) rating of the bulb? What is the color-rendering index (CRI) that determines if colors in a room are truly the colors the eye perceives? This very basic information will help you think through your lighting choices for every area of your new or renovated facility.

Just the Basics —

Lumen output, color temperatures, CRI ratings, beam spread, lamp life depreciation, and rated lamp life can all dramatically affect your design. However, with the help of photometric software, you can visualize what a proposed design will look like even before it’s started.

  • Lumen – The total amount of visible light emitted from a source in a particular direction. The higher the lumens the brighter the light source is. Typically one lumen equals one candela (or foot-candle). A candela is equivalent to the light emitted from a single candle burning.
  • Color Temperature (Kelvin) – This determines the “warmness” or “coolness” of a particular lamp measured in Kelvin’s. The lower Kelvin ratings give a warmer appearance. The higher Kelvin ratings give a cooler appearance. Warmer colors typically emit a more orange to yellow appearance while cooler colors typically emit a more blue to pink appearance. Daylight is a mixture of both cool and warm colors.
  • Color Rendering Index (CRI) – The ability of a lamp to render the color of an object in a normal and natural way. Typically measured from 0-100. The higher the rating, the better the color appearance of an object. Lower ratings may give an object a false color appearance (a beige wall may look gray under certain lighting, for example)
  • Beam Spread – The total angle of a projected beam of light.
  • Lamp Life Depreciation – This measures the overall lumen depreciation level over the life of a particular lamp.
  • Rated Lamp Life – The actual number of hours a particular lamp will burn before failing
  • Photometric – Actual candela (foot-candle) plots that can be placed on a floor plan for a particular light fixture. There are thousands of different types of photometric files that are specific to a particular fixture. These files are called .IES files, which are certified by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) and are entered into lighting calculation software.

lights

Types of Light Sources

There are a wide variety of light sources available to illuminate a particular space. However, there is no “one size fits all” category. Some sources are better suited for certain environments rather than others.

  • Fluorescent – The most commonly and widely used light source available today. They can be found in a wide variety of different types of fixtures: 2×2, 1×4, 2×4, 4×4, 4’ strips, downlighting, undercabinet and decorative lighting.
  • Incandescent – Commonly found in floor and table lamps, downlighting, and flood lighting. This lighting is very inefficient in regards to power consumption and is being phased out.
  • Halogen – Commonly found in small, decorative fixtures, smaller downlights, landscape lighting and floor lamps. These sources can also be found in house lighting for theaters and sanctuaries.
  • High Intensity Discharge (HID) – Commonly found in exterior fixtures consisting of Metal Halide, Low Pressure Sodium or High Pressure Sodium light sources.
  • Light Emitting Diode (LED) – An alternative to fluorescent light sources as the technology continues to improve and prices drop. Commonly found in a wide variety of interior and exterior fixtures due to the best “bang for the buck” in regards to energy consumption versus lumen output.
  • Induction – This source is similar to fluorescent lamp, except it doesn’t have electrodes as part of the fixture. Therefore, these sources have a much longer lamp life than any other source available. However, they’re cost prohibitive and limited in applications and lamp wattage.

FayettevilleWeb

Control

You don’t have to be limited to just on/off switching to control light levels in a space. Dimming or dual level switching is a common practice to control different light levels. Daylight harvesting can be used to switch off or dim lighting near windows. When they’re not in use, occupancy/vacancy sensors switch off lights. Furthermore, Building Automation Systems (BAS) can be tied into lighting systems for seamless building wide control, even remotely

Providing control to automatically switch off lighting when it isn’t needed saves the owner money on their energy bill. Control devices are also eligible for incentives and rebates from many different power companies around the country.

Alternatives

One of the best and most abundant sources of illumination is daylight. Bringing more daylight into a space will reduce the amount of artificial illumination needed. Roof penetrating “Solar Tubes” with internal mirrors and lensed reflectors bring in a surprising amount of daylight from such a small footprint. Skylights and large windows are another great way to bring in large amounts of daylight. Building orientation and landscaping are also an important factor in regards to the amount of daylight that can be brought into a space.

Conclusion

Picking the right illumination source early in the design process is only part of the solution. Coordinating with the architect and interior designer in regards to the space design is critical. Most of the design criteria can be summed up in five simple questions:

Who – Who will be using this space? Input from the end user is always a valuable resource. Ask about a typical day for the space and what type of people may occupy. Also ask about any existing lighting issues that need to be resolved.

What – What will the space be used for? Different lighting levels may be needed for different scenarios. For example, a classroom could be used for children, adults or both.

Where – Where will this space be located? Is it on the perimeter of a building where day lighting could be utilized? Or is it in a dark basement with a low ceiling? It’s also important to know which jurisdiction the space falls under. Some areas of the country, California for example, are much more strict in regards to energy consumption which will affect the lighting design.

When – Will this space be used mostly during the day, night, week, weekends or 24/7? Knowing when the space will be occupied will help determine lighting control of the space.

Why – Why is the space being designed a certain way? Are there moveable partitions or furniture that can be moved to alter the space? By knowing this, it will help determine the switching of the lighting.

COTAWeb

Troubleshooting

Take a moment to look up at the lighting in your surrounding space. See anything that looks strange?

  • Different colored lamps
  • Lamps that are burned out
  • Bugs, dust, and debris in the lenses
  • Reflectors that aren’t clean
  • Fixtures that are switched on when no one is around

Each one of these factors contributes to an environment where the lighting is not ideal. Not only can these eventually put a strain on your eyes, they can also affect the mood of an employee. Remember up front research is essential and is preparation for a well-designed structure and space. It is necessary in order to get a good idea of what the space is going to look like before the design is even started. By following these methods, you and your client will have a better understanding as to what to expect once the lights are switched on for the first time.

Acworth Health Park Featured in Healthcare Design Magazine

The Acworth Health Park, designed by CDH Partners, Inc., has quickly become a model for a system-wide approach for community wellness and care. The comprehensive medical facility offers a full complement of services that includes diagnostic imaging, women’s services, ambulatory surgery, physical therapy, multispecial rehabilitation, urgent care, physicians offices including primary care, OB/GYN, pediatrics, cardiac/Pulmonary, orthopedics, and a sleep center.

It was one of the first health parks built in Georgia and was developed to meet the needs of the surrounding community by offering a higher level of patient care in a safe setting. The first two floors of the health park contain physician’s offices, which are leased mostly by doctors within the Medical Group. Click here to continue reading.

WellStar Paulding Hospital: Taking Shape Quickly!

Here is a pictorial update of the WellStar Paulding Hospital.  The main entry to the hospital provides clear wayfinding and simple entry sequence.

D7K_9500Joshua

The Paulding Outpatient Pavilion will connect to the Hospital through a central Atrium.

D7K_9506Front

The chapel overlooks a healing meditation garden.

D7K_9516MainStairsWeb

The main lobby stairway provides active design and encourages mobility and wellness for staff and visitors.

D7K_9512InsideFront

The concourse connects the main lobby to the dining and emergency department.

FrontHallWeb

The dining area is flooded with natural light.

D7K_9520FrontHallWeb

The “wave wall” provides acoustic balance and positive distraction.

D7K_9538ER

The emergency department uses clerestory to bring natural light to the interior support spaces.

D7K_9557SecondFloorWeb

The outpatient lobby connects the Atrium to the Paulding outpatient Pavilion and the Paulding Physicians Center.

D7K_9594BacksideWindowWall

The central atrium extends more than 60 feet and connects 5 stories of the Hospital

D7K_9599PatientRoomWeb

Each patient room has a large window overlooking the surrounding landscape.

D7K_9671PlantWeb

The central energy plants provides power to the eight story, state-of-the-art facility.

D7K_9683AdminArea

The Clubhouse will provide workspace to the hospital’s administration and managers.

D7K_9525ColorWeb

Choosing colors that will work with the environment.

Take the “Ill” out of Illumination: How to Properly Light a Space

lights

When a space is designed, we usually assume that the lighting will properly illuminate the area evenly. However, have you ever thought about what type of light source should actually be used? What the color temperature (Kelvin) rating of the bulbs is? Or what is the color-rendering index (CRI) that determines if colors in a room are truly the colors your eye thinks it sees?

Look up at the lighting in your surrounding space. See anything that looks strange?
• Different colored lamps.
• Lamps that are burned out.
• Bugs, dust, and debris in the lenses.
• Reflectors that aren’t clean.
• Fixtures that are switched on when no one is around.

Each one of these factors contributes to an environment where the lighting is not ideal. Not only can these eventually put a strain on your eyes, they can also affect the mood of an employee.So where do you start in regards to providing a good lighting design? The basics. Know your options in regards to what types of lighting fixtures and lamp sources are available. By planning your design for illumination up front, you’ll have a better understanding of what the space is going to look like when the design progresses.

Definitions
Lumen output, color temperatures, CRI ratings, beam spread, lamp life depreciation, and rated lamp life can all dramatically affect your design. However, with the help of photometric software, you can visualize what a proposed design will look like even before it’s started.

• Lumen – Is the total amount of visible light emitted from a source in a particular direction. The higher the lumens are, the brighter the light source will be. Typically one lumen equals one candela (or foot-candle). A candela is equivalent to the light emitted from a single candle burning.
• Color Temperature (Kelvin) – Determines the “warmness” or “coolness” of a particular lamp measured in Kelvin’s. The lower Kelvin ratings give a warmer appearance of a lamp. The higher Kelvin ratings give a cooler appearance of a lamp. Warmer colors typically emit a more orange to yellow appearance while cooler colors typically emit a more blue to pink appearance. Daylight is a mixture of both cool and warm colors.
• Color Rendering Index (CRI) – The ability of a lamp to render the color of an object in a normal and natural way. Typically measured from 0-100. The higher the rating, the better the color appearance of an object. Lower ratings may give an object a false color appearance (a beige wall may look gray under certain lighting, for example)
• Beam Spread – The total angle of a projected beam of light.
• Lamp Life Depreciation – Measures the overall lumen depreciation level over the life of a particular lamp.
• Rated Lamp Life – The actual number of hours a particular lamp will burn before failing
• Photometrics – Actual candela (foot-candle) plots that can be placed on a floor plan for a particular light fixture.  There are thousands of different types of photometric files that are specific to a particular fixture. These files are called .IES files, which are certified by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) and are entered into lighting calculation software.

Types of Light Sources
There are a wide variety of light sources available to illuminate a particular space. However, there is no “one size fits all” category.  Some sources are better suited for certain environments rather than others.

• Fluorescent – The most commonly and widely used light source available today.  They can be found in a wide variety of different types of fixtures: 2×2, 1×4, 2×4, 4×4, 4’ strips, downlighting, undercabinet and decorative lighting.
• Incandescent – Commonly found in floor and table lamps, downlighting, and flood lighting. Very inefficient in regards to power consumption. This particular light source is being phased out.
• Halogen – Commonly found in small, decorative fixtures, smaller downlights, landscape lighting, house lighting for theaters and sanctuaries and some floor lamps.
• High Intensity Discharge (HID) – Commonly found in exterior fixtures consisting of Metal Halide, Low Pressure Sodium or High Pressure Sodium light sources.
• Light Emitting Diode (LED) Have become a viable alternative to fluorescent light sources as the technology continues to improve and prices drop. Commonly found in a wide variety of interior and exterior fixtures due to the best “bang for the buck” in regards to energy consumption versus lumen output.
• Induction – This source is similar to fluorescent lamp, except it doesn’t have electrodes as part of the fixture. Therefore, these sources have a much longer lamp life than any other source available. However, they’re cost prohibitive and limited in applications and lamp wattage.

Control
You don’t have to be limited to just on/off switching to control light levels in a space. Dimming or dual level switching is a common practice to control different light levels. Daylight harvesting can be used to switch off or dim lighting near windows. When they’re not in use, occupancy/vacancy sensors switch off lights. And Building Automation Systems (BAS) can be tied into lighting systems for seamless building wide control, even remotely!

Providing control to automatically switch off lighting when it isn’t needed saves the owner money on their energy bill. Control devices are also eligible for incentives and rebates from many different power companies from around the country.

Alternatives
One of the best and most abundant sources of illumination is daylight. Bringing more daylight into a space will reduce the amount of artificial illumination needed. Roof penetrating “Solar Tubes” with internal mirrors and lensed reflectors bring in a surprising amount of daylight from such a small footprint. Skylights and large windows are another great way to bring in large amounts of daylight. Building orientation and landscaping are also an important factor in regards to the amount of daylight that can be brought into a space.

Conclusion
Picking the right illumination source early in the design process is only part of the solution. Coordinating with the architect and interior designer in regards to the space design is critical. Determine who is going to use the space and what they’re going to use it for. Will it be occupied continuously or periodically? Will it be used during the day, at night, or both?

There is some up front research that must be completed before a lighting design takes place. But this is necessary in order to get a good idea of what the space is going to look like before the design is even started. This will help the architect, interior designer, and owner choose the proper design approach for the space.

CDH Named Top Architectural Firm

CDHBuilding

Marietta, Georgia — In a recent issue of the Atlanta Business Chronicle, CDH Partners was named one of the top architectural firms in Georgia. It was ranked number nine in a list of 25 top firms in the state. William Chegwidden president and one of the founding principals said, “This is a tremendous achievement for our firm. It demonstrates the dedication our employees have to CDH and to each project we undertake.”

Last year, CDH was listed 15 out of 25. This year’s move up in this year’s rankings is a credit to the quality of work and the dedication CDH has to its clients and the metro Atlanta community.

CDH was founded in 1977 and incorporated in January 1993 as CDH Partners, Inc. The firm was named after its three founding partners, Bill Chegwidden, Don Dorsey, and Chuck Holmes. Over the years, it has repeatedly been recognized as one of the top ten largest and most progressive architectural firms in Atlanta and in the southeast.

It offers in-house interior design and professional engineering services to compliment the base architectural services. Engineering disciplines include civil, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and structural. Areas of specialty include medical, assisted living, educational, religious, and engineering.

CDH employs over 70 people and included in that number are 10 architects, 9 engineers, 5 Interior Designers, and a support staff of 10. Managing principals include: William Chegwidden, David Strickland, Melissa Cantrell, and Paul Stegenga.

More than 75,000 patients receive care each day in a CDH designed facility. And each Sunday over 500,000 people across the country worship in churches planned and designed by CDH. Along with this number are the thousands that study and work in educational environments designed and built by CDH architects and engineers.

Chegwidden explains, “Each project entrusted to CDH provides an opportunity for us to become personally involved in the lives, visions, and futures of others. It is our opportunity to serve others for a greater purpose.

“This perspective not only drives the way we do our day-to-day work, it is the reason why we do what we do. Most importantly, we share the enthusiasm and concern a client has whether it involves healthcare, education, religious, or another area. I believe the one thing that sets us a part as a firm is our commitment to listen, to communicate and to document the needs and desires of our clients.”

Many of the services CDH offers as “standard and in-house” are treated and billed as extras by other firms. The company’s basic professional service plan includes architectural planning, engineering, interior design and more depending upon what fits your present need.

CDH Partners corporate offices are located at 675 Tower Rd, Marietta, Georgia, and are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For more information about CDH Partners, please call (770) 423-0016.

 

 

Blurring the Lines Between Community and Church

in_26220_-_gym2

 

While the Bridge Community Center is a part of the ministry of First Baptist Church Peachtree City, Georgia, it also has a broad outreach to the progressive community surrounding it. This brightly designed 23,000 square foot public facility contains multi-purpose classrooms used for support groups and tutoring, meeting rooms, a walking track, gym, and café with open lobby seating area offering free WiFi. The youth area provides indoor recreational space that includes a gym, a basketball court, and a theatrical stage with a state of the art audio and video system used for performing arts and concerts.

Learn how this church is blurring the lines between itself and surrounding community. Continuing Reading