Posts Tagged ‘church educational facility’

Foundations! First Baptist Church of Jonesboro

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Editor’s note: The following article appears in the May 2016 issue of Religious Product News.

First Baptist Church of Jonesboro has enjoyed much success at its greater Atlanta-area campus. In 2001, the church began upgrading its facilities, starting by adding a Recreation Outreach Center, called The ROC, as a ministry for youth.

In 2010, the church took on a major renovation of its 57,500-square-foot worship center. The next step was to renovate and expand its existing three-story children’s building.

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Church leadership called on CDH Partners from Marietta, Georgia, the architects they had used for its previous projects, to help streamline their plans.

During previous renovations, the church had moved its fellowship hall from the first floor of the 30,000-square-foot children’s building to its old gymnasium, which opened a large amount of space. The building also had a drive-under portion that architects posed closing to add even more space.

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The renovated first floor would provide a secure entrance to the Children’s Center, as well as lead to the sanctuary. This floor would include classrooms and playrooms for toddlers and pre-K students. The second floor would have classrooms for younger elementary students. And the third floor would have classrooms for older elementary students. Please continue reading.

Redan High School receives recognition

Redan High School recently received an Architectural Showcase Outstanding Project award from Learning by Design Magazine, which is the premier source for education design innovation and excellence.

The twenty-five instructional units, two-story addition and major renovation of the existing core building offer large spans of glazing and open volumes to the high school campus. The new addition frames a new architectural dialogue of clean lines and contemporary design for the campus. Veneered in a modular brick with punched openings, the form of the academic wing extends the length of the addition and pierces the media center and fine arts wing.

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The media center is a focal point as an exaggerated slicing plane through the form of the simple what box.

Please click here to continue reading.

To view the digital page click here and go to page 70.

Dawson Memorial Baptist Church featured

Editor’s note: The educational facility on the campus of Dawson Memorial Baptist Church located in Birmingham, AL, was recently featured in Religious Product News. This new facility along with other renovations was a CDH design project. Ernest “Terry” Biglow was the principal interviewed concerning this project. This post contains a portion of the article below and a link to the entire article. 

Dawson Memorial Baptist Church

By: Jennifer Walker-Journey – Religious Product News

With more than 7,800 members, Dawson Memorial Baptist Church is one of the largest churches in the Birmingham, Alabama, suburb of Homewood. Over the years, the campus has expanded to include an administration building, family life center, and a parking deck.

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One of the church’s priorities is serving its families, which means children are of particular interest. In fact, church families welcomed 70 new babies a year for the past three years. The original education building dated back to 1965 and was “bursting at the seams with young people, which is fantastic,” the Rev. Gary Fenton told The Birmingham News.

Knowing this, it is easy to understand why the church’s leadership focused on creating a better environment for its children and youth. But renovation and expansion was challenge from the start. Dawson’s campus offered little room for a new building or an expansion. Even the church’s administration building was built across the street from the church.

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But there was hope and the leadership team discovered this when they sat down with architects and engineers with CDH Partners in Marietta, Georgia. Their options were drawn up. Designers proposed that the church purchase the street between the back of sanctuary and the administration building. A new education building would be constructed in between these two structures.

It was a clever idea, but one that neighboring residents just couldn’t warm up to. The church and architects eventually realized it had to scrap those plans and, literally, head back to the drawing board.

“It had really forced our hand on the location of the building,” explained architect Terry Biglow, who is an associate principal with CDH. “In fact, the only space left was the front yard, and that’s what we used.”

The new addition connects to the existing education building and stands between the sanctuary and family life center, and angles toward Oxmoor Road—a main thoroughfare that runs through Homewood.

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The addition is a four-story facility that fits perfectly with the traditional sanctuary and other campus structures. A window wall was used to bring natural light into a stairway that also is a nighttime visual element.

Biglow explains, “Because of local zoning height restrictions, a basement level with areaways on each side was included in the design.” Each level has eight classrooms, some of which have operable partitions. On the top floor, four of the eight classrooms were merged together to form an auditorium for youth performances and meeting space.

Click here to continue reading or here for the digital version of Religious Product News and turn to pages 14-15.

Best religious structure – First United Methodist Orlando

First United Methodist Church located in Orlando, Florida, was recently awarded the 2013 Design Award for Best Religious Structure for Precast Concrete. The church has been located in the city’s downtown area for over 100 years. Judges for the competition said, “This project was selected because of the unique pattern in the precast concrete and because most of its LEED Silver points came from the precast panels due to their durability, energy efficiency, and the lifecycle precast adds to a facility.”

02/2012-First United Methoodist Church Orlando, Fl.

CDH architects and interior designers created a modern addition to complement this traditional-styled sanctuary. In April 2012, the spacious fellowship hall was completed. It contains an 82,000 square foot contemporary worship center with a seating capacity of 350. Also included in the design is a 125-seat chapel that contains a parlor, bride’s suite, music suite, adult and children’s classrooms, nurseries, and an administrative suite. Designers placed the parking area beneath the new addition to help with its sustainability while reducing the overall footprint of the project.

02/2012-First United Methoodist Church Orlando, Fl.

The fellowship hall was designed to be spacious containing areas where people can meet and gather. It also contains an upscale café and a full service kitchen. An oversized sculpture resembling Stonehenge creates an imaginative divider between the fellowship hall, kitchen, and information desk. It also serves as a recreation destination for children, who play on its painted metal towers.

A custom 16-foot light fixture hangs in the center of the fellowship hall and is highly visible through glass exterior walls, which form a three-story atrium and serves as a signature feature to the new ministry center. At night this striking feature becomes a luminary for the city of Orlando. This structure is LEED Silver certified. Energy costs were reduced by almost 18 percent through lighting selection, e–glass windows, high efficiency solutions for HVAC, high efficiency water reduction fixtures, and energy-star appliances.

To read more about this structure and its place in the 2013 Design Awards, please click here.

Truly engaging youth spaces

Editor’s note: Paulla Shetterly, RID, IIDA, LEED AP, is an associate principal and director of Interior Design at CDH Partners, Inc. She has been published in  design journals and magazines and is also a noted speaker. She was recently published in the December 2013 issue of Church Executive Magazine.

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By Paulla Shetterly

When done right, these areas motivate, encourage, teach — and even inspire kids to draw their parents to church.

While youth and children’s spaces in the church are designed to motivate, encourage and teach principles that last a lifetime, they also need to be fun environments where kids can be kids — and be inspired to invite others to join them.

When a designer has a heart for this type of work, he or she will seek to create places that capture the imagination of the children and the youth who use them. In fact, this needs to be a primary goal.

During the master planning process, a plan can change many times. But, one thing that needs to remain constant is the designer’s commitment to the church’s mission. Be very deliberate with this.

Then, when a vision for a particular youth ministry begins to take shape, the vision for the space will also become clear. Click here to continue reading.

First United Methodist Orlando Receives 2013 Best Religious Structure Award

The First United Methodist Church in Orlando, Florida, was recently awarded the 2013 Best Religious Structure Design Award by PCI. The church has been located in the city’s trendy downtown area for over 100 years

CDH architects and interior designers created a modern addition to the traditional styled sanctuary, which contains an 82,000 square foot contemporary worship center with a seating capacity of 350. Also included in the design was a 125-seat chapel that contains a parlor, bride’s suite, music suite, adult and children’s classrooms, nurseries, and an administrative suite.

02/2012-First United Methoodist Church Orlando, Fl.

 

In April 2012, a spacious fellowship hall was completed, which contains an upscale café and a full service kitchen. It also serves as a recreation destination for children, who play in specially designed themed areas.

A custom 16-foot light fixture hangs in the center of the fellowship hall and is highly visible through glass exterior walls, which form a three-story atrium and serves as a signature feature to the new ministry center. At night this striking feature becomes a luminary for the city of Orlando. The new structure is LEED Silver certified and energy costs have already been reduced by almost 18 percent through lighting selection, e–glass windows, high efficiency solutions for HVAC, high efficiency water reduction fixtures, and energy-star appliances.

02/2012-First United Methoodist Church Orlando, Fl.

 

Writing for PCI’s publication Ascent Magazine, Sarah Fister Gale writes, “”Today’s architects and engineers are under constant pressure to deliver beautiful, durable structures within constrained budgets and schedules. The winner of the 2013 PCI Design Awards Competition demonstrate the ways that precast concrete helps them meet those goals.

“This year’s winners showcase the high-performance attributes that precast, prestressed concrete can bring to a project. . . . Precast concrete enable all of the winners to accelerate construction, often while working in extremely tight site conditions with minimal effects on traffic, the community, and the local environment.

“The awards covered an array of building types, include best Parking structure, Best Mixed-Use Building, and Best Religious structure, along with a variety of bridge types and lengths. . . . Each of this year’s award winners proved that precast concrete brings beauty, strength, and efficiency to all types of structures and will continue to be a go-to materal for engineers and architects seeking high performance.”