Posts Tagged ‘Planning’

U.S. News features the safety of Paulding Hospital

Editor’s note: In a recent short article on hospital safety, editors at U. S. News & World Report highlighted Paulding Hospital (a CDH design project) and the technology that is being used to keep patients safe.

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The “Hospitals Make Progress on the Path to Safety” article noted WellStar Paulding Hospital has all private rooms and patient-facing handwashing stations to help prevent the spread of infection. The stations feature soap dispensers with wireless antennas that help ensure team members always wash hands upon entering a patient’s room. ​

The news feature also discussed the positioning of patient beds just one step away from the restrooms with lighted handrails that help eliminate middle-of-the-night falls when patients are hesitant to ask for assistance getting out of bed. Furthermore, the rooms comfortably accommodate family members. Click here to continue reading.

Why we must continue to change

by Bill Chegwidden FAIA, founding principal and president CDH Partners

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Forty years ago, I remember being in a worship service where the pastor spoke with a missionary by telephone, who was living on the other side of the world. The conversation was broadcast live and everyone in attendance was amazed by what they heard.

If that same missionary was with us today, he or she would have even more of an opportunity to engage an audience and to become an integral part of the service. Digital technology creates an atmosphere where individuals on the other side of the city, state, country, or world can appear to be on stage in front of us. But the technology doesn’t stop here. It goes far beyond this to a point where a church can become a central point of focus within a community by using various forms of media and communication. It all begins when church leaders ask a very important question: How do we connect the needs of our congregation in today’s evolving digital world? 

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For years, churches have looked for effective ways to bridge this growing gap by having a traditional and non-traditional worship services but change has always been hard. Just a few years ago, architects designed churches and worship centers with long narrow hallways, large classrooms, and very few gathering spaces. We’ve moved away from this because we realize that people crave community. They want to worship in churches that provide areas and spaces that encourage interaction and engagement. And they want these areas to be places that are welcoming, bright, and warm. Some contain fireplaces, coffee bars, Wi-Fi, and an atmosphere that is engaging and builds community. They are places where people connect with others. To continue reading this article, please click here.

 

 

 

Video Just Release on New Paulding Hospital!

The new CDH designed Paulding Hospital is the second phase for the 33-acre development located in Hiram, GA. This new hospital opened in April 2014 and has 56 beds and has the capacity for 112 beds. This state-of-the-art hospital is one of the safest in the country. Click here to view the video!

WellStar Paulding Hospital featured by Heathcare Design

The WellStar Paulding Hospital, which is a CDH design project will be featured at the upcoming HCD September Design Showcase. The project will also be highlighted in the Healthcare Design Showcase Magazine and online. Click here to view this amazing project.

Paulla Shetterly discusses the latest on flooring

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Editor’s note: In the recent issue of Designer Magazine, Paulla Shetterly addresses the subject of flooring finishes.

In the article she explains, “Many faith-based spaces operate up to six days a week, durability is a huge concern when it comes to flooring. This has resulted in expanding material selections from porcelain tile to luxury vinyl tile that emulates the look and feel of wood. Clear here to continue reading.

Health Facilities Management Magazine features Paulding Hospital and CDH

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WellStar Paulding Hospital, Designed by CDH Partners is featured in this month’s cover story in Health Facilities Management Magazine. The article is titled: “Safe and Sound.”

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Informed design approaches help to prevent patient harm

WellStar Paulding Hospital, Hiram, Ga., designed by CDH Partners, is another facility for which safety was a prime directive during design. Mark Haney, president, WellStar Paulding Hospital, explains that the hospital developed a program called “safety to the fourth power” to lead design decisions. This involved considering the safety of patients and  their families, hospital staff, the community and the environment. “That was the banner they carried throughout the project,” says Mary Lindeman, EDAC, LEED AP BD+C, senior project manager, CDH Partners. Please click here to read the entire article.

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Pediatric Imaging Center Nears Completion

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Later this summer WellStar Healthcare will open a children’s Pediatric center in NW Cobb County. This new facility has been designed for an extraordinary patient experience. “The challenge was to design a pediatric facility for a wide range of ages—from babies to adolescents,” says CDH project manager Rhea Jeanne Starnes.

“Many times rooms in other diagnostic centers will be colorful but this one takes color and design to another level. When it comes to imaging, WellStar is highly successful. There are children centers in place around the metro Atlanta area, but this center is different because it’s a specialty, multi-functional facility designed for kids.”

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“WellStar really cares about the type of images they get, and they are using Phillips equipment, which is the top of the line. Phillips also delivers an “ambient” experience. This means that there are positive distractions built in through audio and visual technology, which is patient driven. This type of experience helps a patient relax and feel calm. It also provides better outcomes.”

Ambient lighting is soft and pleasing. It includes calming sounds for less stress and increased procedure efficiency. “Patients, in this case children, have to be really still for a long period of time, and the ambient experience can help them do this better. After all, it can be frightening to have a scan done when Mom or Dad are not as close as usual.”

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WellStar is taking a further step by also including a Kitten Scanner in the facility. This is a small version of a larger scanner that is used to help children learn about their procedures. They can scan a dinosaur, a chicken, space man, or elephant. The model scanner scans the toy and then displays its “insides” on screen. This small screen helps to clarify the scanner’s purpose. As children play with the scanner, their attention is redirected to having fun rather than worrying about the upcoming procedure.

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When designers for CDH saw the potential to increase the overall experience for patients and parents, they made a bold decision to use the ambient concept as a main design element. A large interactive screen will be located in the lobby and before they have their procedure, patients can choose what scene they would like to have in their MRI, CT, or X-Ray rooms. For example, if someone chooses a beach scene, his or her procedure room will be transform in to a beach, complete with tropical fish, and audio sounds.

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“This is a place where I would want my son or daughter to go. But it is also a place where I would feel comfortable sitting and waiting while the procedure is done. We wanted a patient to walk in the door and be met with positive distractions that reduce stress and help them to feel calmer. There is light and color everywhere. So, it is really quite magical from the entrance through the entire building.”

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WellStar Paulding Hospital set to open

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A ribbon cutting ceremony was held recently for the Wellstar Paulding Hospital. It is a CDH Partners project, which opens on April 1, 2014. The 56-bed hospital is designed for future expansion that will grow to be a 112-bed facility.

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Paulding is an eight-story, 250,000 square foot, Energy Star facility that offers core medical amenities that include emergency services for adults and children, an accredited chest pain center, and private patient rooms, telemetry and medical/surgical, surgery, GI and bronch services, along with ear, nose, and throat care.

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Cancer therapies will be done on site. The hospital will also offer in patient and out patient imaging. Plus, it will have a state-of-the-art women’s imaging center.

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CDH Partners began work on the green field site in Hiram, Georgia with a single medical office building completed in 2007.

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The site was master planned for a future hospital and additional medical office building. CDH Partners continues to serve WellStar as the design firm for replacement hospital and the second medical office building. This facility is the second phase for the 33-acre development.

Redan High School receives recognition

Redan High School recently received an Architectural Showcase Outstanding Project award from Learning by Design Magazine, which is the premier source for education design innovation and excellence.

The twenty-five instructional units, two-story addition and major renovation of the existing core building offer large spans of glazing and open volumes to the high school campus. The new addition frames a new architectural dialogue of clean lines and contemporary design for the campus. Veneered in a modular brick with punched openings, the form of the academic wing extends the length of the addition and pierces the media center and fine arts wing.

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The media center is a focal point as an exaggerated slicing plane through the form of the simple what box.

Please click here to continue reading.

To view the digital page click here and go to page 70.

Dawson Memorial Baptist Church featured

Editor’s note: The educational facility on the campus of Dawson Memorial Baptist Church located in Birmingham, AL, was recently featured in Religious Product News. This new facility along with other renovations was a CDH design project. Ernest “Terry” Biglow was the principal interviewed concerning this project. This post contains a portion of the article below and a link to the entire article. 

Dawson Memorial Baptist Church

By: Jennifer Walker-Journey – Religious Product News

With more than 7,800 members, Dawson Memorial Baptist Church is one of the largest churches in the Birmingham, Alabama, suburb of Homewood. Over the years, the campus has expanded to include an administration building, family life center, and a parking deck.

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One of the church’s priorities is serving its families, which means children are of particular interest. In fact, church families welcomed 70 new babies a year for the past three years. The original education building dated back to 1965 and was “bursting at the seams with young people, which is fantastic,” the Rev. Gary Fenton told The Birmingham News.

Knowing this, it is easy to understand why the church’s leadership focused on creating a better environment for its children and youth. But renovation and expansion was challenge from the start. Dawson’s campus offered little room for a new building or an expansion. Even the church’s administration building was built across the street from the church.

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But there was hope and the leadership team discovered this when they sat down with architects and engineers with CDH Partners in Marietta, Georgia. Their options were drawn up. Designers proposed that the church purchase the street between the back of sanctuary and the administration building. A new education building would be constructed in between these two structures.

It was a clever idea, but one that neighboring residents just couldn’t warm up to. The church and architects eventually realized it had to scrap those plans and, literally, head back to the drawing board.

“It had really forced our hand on the location of the building,” explained architect Terry Biglow, who is an associate principal with CDH. “In fact, the only space left was the front yard, and that’s what we used.”

The new addition connects to the existing education building and stands between the sanctuary and family life center, and angles toward Oxmoor Road—a main thoroughfare that runs through Homewood.

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The addition is a four-story facility that fits perfectly with the traditional sanctuary and other campus structures. A window wall was used to bring natural light into a stairway that also is a nighttime visual element.

Biglow explains, “Because of local zoning height restrictions, a basement level with areaways on each side was included in the design.” Each level has eight classrooms, some of which have operable partitions. On the top floor, four of the eight classrooms were merged together to form an auditorium for youth performances and meeting space.

Click here to continue reading or here for the digital version of Religious Product News and turn to pages 14-15.

Southwest DeKalb High School addition takes shape

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Editor’s note: Please click on images for enlargement.

When it came to the construction of a 67,000 square foot instructional addition that includes a 650-seat auditorium, state-of-the-art classrooms, laboratories, and offices for Southwest DeKalb High School, designers for CDH Partners also created a plan that included a partial renovation of this major educational facility.

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The two-story facility was designed to create an iconic presence on the campus and within the community. Window walls at the entrance to the structure provide an abundance of natural light and passive solar gain. The auditorium itself is one of the largest in the district. At 650 seats, the facility was built to accommodate as much of the school’s population as possible. Currently, it’ll hold half of the student population. This auditorium will be used for the performing arts, the musical arts, and also the spoken word. It allows for a lot of functionality within the space and gives those at the school a multipurpose use of the auditorium itself.

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CDH principal Melissa Cantrell says, “The band room is designed to utilize both the indoor and the outdoor space of the facility. The room is large enough to incorporate the entire marching band but is also set up so there could be a back drop installed to open up the doors to the amphitheater, which is located to the perimeter. This outdoor amphitheater is intended to be an outreach to the community and provide an impromptu area to meet and to gather.” 

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“We incorporated within the design of the auditorium space a large curtain wall that was designed to open up the building to the community. It is an area that will contain an art gallery for student artwork and an area for the performing arts to allow the community to see into the facility both day and night. And allow it as a beacon to the community to bring them and engage them into the facility.”

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This important addition presents a contemporary and dominant façade to the street. And its modern style includes tall folding doors at the rear of the building, which open to an outdoor grass terraced amphitheater. These large connecting doors allows indoor and outdoor activities to interact.

Best religious structure – First United Methodist Orlando

First United Methodist Church located in Orlando, Florida, was recently awarded the 2013 Design Award for Best Religious Structure for Precast Concrete. The church has been located in the city’s downtown area for over 100 years. Judges for the competition said, “This project was selected because of the unique pattern in the precast concrete and because most of its LEED Silver points came from the precast panels due to their durability, energy efficiency, and the lifecycle precast adds to a facility.”

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CDH architects and interior designers created a modern addition to complement this traditional-styled sanctuary. In April 2012, the spacious fellowship hall was completed. It contains an 82,000 square foot contemporary worship center with a seating capacity of 350. Also included in the design is a 125-seat chapel that contains a parlor, bride’s suite, music suite, adult and children’s classrooms, nurseries, and an administrative suite. Designers placed the parking area beneath the new addition to help with its sustainability while reducing the overall footprint of the project.

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The fellowship hall was designed to be spacious containing areas where people can meet and gather. It also contains an upscale café and a full service kitchen. An oversized sculpture resembling Stonehenge creates an imaginative divider between the fellowship hall, kitchen, and information desk. It also serves as a recreation destination for children, who play on its painted metal towers.

A custom 16-foot light fixture hangs in the center of the fellowship hall and is highly visible through glass exterior walls, which form a three-story atrium and serves as a signature feature to the new ministry center. At night this striking feature becomes a luminary for the city of Orlando. This structure is LEED Silver certified. Energy costs were reduced by almost 18 percent through lighting selection, e–glass windows, high efficiency solutions for HVAC, high efficiency water reduction fixtures, and energy-star appliances.

To read more about this structure and its place in the 2013 Design Awards, please click here.

CDH Partners win awards for GSA Laboratory

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection recently opened its new analytical laboratory and office complex near the Port of Savannah in coastal Georgia. The firm selected to design this high-tech, secure facility was CDH Partners—an architectural and design practice located in Marietta, Georgia. The project design team incorporated sustainable design strategies that led to the facility being awarded a LEED Silver Certification. It also received the Award of Excellence in the Low Rise category from the Georgia Chapter ACI awards.

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CDH provided full professional services that included architectural, engineering and interior design for the project. The 38,100 square foot one-story facility contains 12 state-of-the-art laboratories including level 100 and 1000 clean rooms, a garage/warehouse, five analyst team offices with breakout areas and a conference room. The Customs and Border Protection Agency opened the 25 million dollar laboratory as a replacement for a much smaller facility. Customs officials use this location to analyze imported merchandise ranging from raw chemical products to finished manufactured goods, such as clothing and steel products, as well as controlled substances and contraband imported in violation of U.S. laws.

“Millions of tax dollars are at stake,” says a spokesperson in a recent article published by GPB News, “It’s not just food and toys. Shoes, handbags and all types of clothing are taxed at varying rates depending on their materials. The lab tests those microscopic fibers. Some of the work done at the Savannah crime lab has led to nationwide product recalls. It investigates trade and law enforcement cases at ports from Philadelphia to Key West.”

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The design practice of CDH Partners, Inc., was founded in 1977. The Marietta firm was named after its three founding partners, Bill Chegwidden, Don Dorsey, and Chuck Holmes. Over the years, it has repeatedly been recognized as one of the top most progressive architectural firms in Atlanta, the southeast, and the country.

Truly engaging youth spaces

Editor’s note: Paulla Shetterly, RID, IIDA, LEED AP, is an associate principal and director of Interior Design at CDH Partners, Inc. She has been published in  design journals and magazines and is also a noted speaker. She was recently published in the December 2013 issue of Church Executive Magazine.

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By Paulla Shetterly

When done right, these areas motivate, encourage, teach — and even inspire kids to draw their parents to church.

While youth and children’s spaces in the church are designed to motivate, encourage and teach principles that last a lifetime, they also need to be fun environments where kids can be kids — and be inspired to invite others to join them.

When a designer has a heart for this type of work, he or she will seek to create places that capture the imagination of the children and the youth who use them. In fact, this needs to be a primary goal.

During the master planning process, a plan can change many times. But, one thing that needs to remain constant is the designer’s commitment to the church’s mission. Be very deliberate with this.

Then, when a vision for a particular youth ministry begins to take shape, the vision for the space will also become clear. Click here to continue reading.

Work Continues on WellStar East Cobb Health Park

Work continues on the latest addition to the WellStar Health Park family. CDH Partners is the architectural firm for the East Cobb project, which is scheduled to open in the fall of 2014. The three-story 205,000 sf health park health park will offer a full complement of services including cardio pulmonary rehab, orthosport rehab, urgent care, imaging, women’s imaging, physician practices such as family, cardio vascular, pulmonary, a sleep lab, ENT, allergy, OB/GYN, general surgery, GI, vascular, endocrinology, urology, spine clinic, and orthopedics. The facility will also have a three-story parking deck and contain a 20,000 sf ambulatory surgery center along with an atrium, a café, a retail pharmacy, and space for community education. (Please click on the photo to enlarge.)

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The front of the East Cobb Health Park takes shapes.

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The Atrium that will contain areas for rest along with a cafe and a retail pharmacy.

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Rock going up on the outside walls.

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Cranes are used at the rear of the building.

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CDH designer Carine Kroko and CDH Structural Engineering Manager Mark Hufstetler look over structural plans.

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Preparing to place stone and WellStar signage.

GPB Publishes Article on CDH Designed Facility

Editor’s Note: GPB.org recently published this article on their website about this CDH LEED Silver designed facility.

SAVANNAH, Ga. — While Christmas toys wait safely under the tree for their big day later this month, you might be surprised to learn how much testing they went through before they hit the shelves. Some of the testing that makes sure those gifts are child-ready goes on right here in Georgia.

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In the port city of Savannah, a new facility has opened to test all types of products coming into the U.S. The Customs and Border Protection crime lab is a quiet, sterile place where chemists in white lab coats walk around enough machinery to conjure a science lab. Click here to continue reading.

 

Paulding Hospital Receives Customers’ Choice Award

Winners of the 2013 SDS/2 Solid Steel Competition were announced during the Design Data Game Show Extravaganza at the SDS/2 Users Group Conference. Awards were given in three categories: Commercial, Industrial and Customers’ Choice.

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The WellStar Paulding Replacement Hospital, a CDH project, located in Hiram, Georgia, receive the Customers’ Choice Award. Click here to view the project on the SDS/2 website or here to view the details of the Paulding hospital project on the CDH website.

Commercial church kitchens

The following article was recently published in Church Executive Magazine. It contains quotes from CDH principal Ernest C. (Terry) Biglow.

By RaeAnn Slaybaugh

A church considering a commercial kitchen finds out quickly it’s a big undertaking. They must navigate a multitude of equipment and construction requirements, plus liabilities, staffing and inspection considerations.

For starters, it helps to understand the basic differences between a commercial kitchen and a warming (residential-style) setup. Ernest C. (Terry) Biglow, III, AIA — managing principal at CDH Partners, Inc., in Marietta, GA — often leads church clients through this complex territory.

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“Commercial kitchens are subject to inspections for compliance with the local health department, and the number of meals served might influence the frequency of those inspections,” he explains. “On the equipment side, anything more than a microwave could be considered a commercial kitchen in some areas of the U.S.”

On the intended use side of the equation, Eric MacInerney, principal and project architect at Heimsath Architects in Austin, TX, says three kinds of activities put a church kitchen on the health department’s radar as a commercial operation: serving a day school, serving the homeless, and selling food. “These create a situation where there’s public trust in the food.”

Since many churches will want to offer these services, a commercial kitchen becomes the logical choice. Once that decision is made, the issue of vent hoods and exhaust systems isn’t far behind. There’s a reason: They’re expensive — and non-negotiable. Click here to continue reading.