Posts Tagged ‘youth’

Foundations! First Baptist Church of Jonesboro

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Editor’s note: The following article appears in the May 2016 issue of Religious Product News.

First Baptist Church of Jonesboro has enjoyed much success at its greater Atlanta-area campus. In 2001, the church began upgrading its facilities, starting by adding a Recreation Outreach Center, called The ROC, as a ministry for youth.

In 2010, the church took on a major renovation of its 57,500-square-foot worship center. The next step was to renovate and expand its existing three-story children’s building.

Corner of Balcony w Graphics

Church leadership called on CDH Partners from Marietta, Georgia, the architects they had used for its previous projects, to help streamline their plans.

During previous renovations, the church had moved its fellowship hall from the first floor of the 30,000-square-foot children’s building to its old gymnasium, which opened a large amount of space. The building also had a drive-under portion that architects posed closing to add even more space.

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The renovated first floor would provide a secure entrance to the Children’s Center, as well as lead to the sanctuary. This floor would include classrooms and playrooms for toddlers and pre-K students. The second floor would have classrooms for younger elementary students. And the third floor would have classrooms for older elementary students. Please continue reading.

Morningside Baptist highlighted in Religious Product News

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(Editor’s note: The following article recently appeared in Religious Product News Magazine)

Morningside Baptist Church in Columbus, Georgia, had always believed that providing a fulfilling church life experience for the entire family was the key ingredient in growing a strong church. When the church needed to expand its facilities to accommodate growing membership, it made sense to reinvest in its ministry programs.

Church leadership organized a Long Range Planning Committee and hired architects, engineers and interior designers from CDH Partners based in Marietta, Georgia, to design a master plan that would address the church’s present ministry needs as well as provide a plan for future expansion as membership continued to grow. The plan would be phased, with the first phase addressing the most pressing desires.

Morningside is a traditional-style, red brick church. The campus consisted of a large sanctuary building, fellowship hall, and a cluster of classroom buildings linked together by walkways. The ministry programs, however, were physically disconnected, scattered among several buildings on campus. This was a primary concern for church leadership, which wanted to tie together the programs together in one building to form a Children’s Ministry Center.

Adult ministry space would also need updating and renovating and, ideally, would connect in some way to the new Children’s Ministry Center.

As part of the planning process, focus groups were organized to help identify areas that could be improved.  A recurring theme that came out of the focus group meetings was the need for more space for preschool, children and pre-teens to worship and express their creativity.

Hall

In response, CDH Partners designed a 39,000-square-foot, two-story building that would be situated behind the current sanctuary. Click here to continue reading.

You can also view the digital online version of this magazine. Click here and turn to page 12.

CDH Partners Wins 2015 Vision Design Award

(Editor’s Note: CDH Partners is the Healthcare Winner for the 2015 Vision Design Awards.)

Chattanooga, TN, April 8, 2015 — Floor Focus Magazine is honored to announce the winners of the sixth annual Vision Design Awards. The competition was created to recognize design firms in a competition that judges the creative integration of flooring and architecture, and this year’s winners offer stellar examples of how flooring plays a key role in great design.

Architects and designers entered recent projects in five commercial building categories: Corporate, Education, Healthcare, Retail and Hospitality. This year’s winners are:

Grand Prize and Hospitality Winner
Project: The New York Palace – a hotel in New York City
Design Firm: Champalimaud in New York, NY

Corporate Winner
Project: Follett Headquarters in Westchester, IL
Design Firm: CannonDesign in Chicago, IL

Education Winner
Project: BZAEDS Innovation Lab in Chicago, IL
Design Firm: Eckenhoff Saunders Architects/Wonder by Design in Chicago, IL

Healthcare Winner
Project: WellStar Pediatric Center in Kennesaw, GA
Design Firm: CDH Partners in Marietta, GA

Retail Winner
Project: Denver Broncos Team Store in Dove Valley, CO
Design Firm: Sink Combs Dethlefs in Denver, CO

Corporate Honorable Mention
Project: MassMutual RS Group
Design Firm: Tecton Architects

Education Honorable Mention
Project: College of DuPage Naperville Regional Center
Design Firm: Edge Design

Hospitality Honorable Mention
Project: Miami International Airport Hotel
Design Firm: Heery International and Miami Dade County Aviation Department

Healthcare Honorable Mention
Project: The Baystate Children’s Specialty Center
Design Firm: Steffian Bradley Architects

Retail Honorable Mention
Project: The Market Place Community Center
Design Firm: Robinson Hill Architecture

The contest is sponsored by Bentley Mills, Tandus-Centiva, Crossville Tile, Johnsonite and Floor Focus Magazine. All product and firm names are stripped from the entries prior to judging so that judging is free of preference and prejudice. Floor Focus applauds these sponsors in their support of the concept of blind judging, ensuring that the contest awards and celebrates design for design’s sake.

 

Sunday at Gardendale First Baptist Church

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Members of the CDH Partners marketing team were recently in Gardendale, Alabama, to shoot a video that will include Gardendale First Baptist Church, it’s campus, the newly constructed Kidz Kingdom, and worship center. The church’s campus and buildings are part of a Master Plan designed by CDH.

Pastor

The membership of Gardendale First Baptist wanted their Master Plan to be structured with the idea of building community and strengthening families. In this photo, the pastor has easy access to the congregation, and Pastor Kevin Hamm makes the most of this fact by personally greeting as many in the congregation as possible.

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CDH Partners President Bill Chegwidden, FAIA, was interviewed about the importance of having a Master Plan and how it helps churches realize their dreams for the future while staying on track financially and physically.

BillDrone

Later after the inside video along with plenty of b-roll was shot, Bill Chegwidden takes a closer look at the construction of the drone that was used to fly over Gardendale’s campus and shoot HD video.

FlyingDrone

A few minutes later, it was launched and flying high. The video of this amazing church is being produced now and will be available for our clients and friends to view in about three weeks.

GardendaleFront

This church has dramatic views and points of interest that brands them as reaching out to the world.

Investing in the Next Generation—by Design

Editor’s note: The following article by Paulla Shetterly, principal and director of Interior Design with CDH Partners, recently appeared in Church Executive Magazine.

“Some among the next generation of believers have become disillusioned with the traditional worship environment. Because of this, we, as designers, have had to rethink how we address the needs of today’s culture without repositioning the timeless truths of the church. It’s a tactical process often involving theming worship and student environments. I’ve learned that the designs must be progressive, because congregations — students and their parents — are progressive.

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This can be a huge challenge for churches. Students want to hear truth, but they want it presented in a way that speaks to their needs and their personal experiences. Theming has become very popular because it represents a commitment, an investment and a buy-in to the lives of others — particularly students and children. Students are looking for churches that offer an intentional worship experience. How a church deals with this often boils down to the design of a facility.

How it takes shape

In designing a worship space for children, we adjust the scale of the themed environment to fit their perspectives. Colors are more intense, elements are added to fit their age group, and areas are designed to be fun and full of natural light. We want them to be eager to go to church and eager to return. We also design secure check-in areas and systems. tires

A major challenge for many churches is creating areas that look and feel like the age group that will be using them. If a church is going to grow and retain its students, the spaces must be sophisticated places of engagement and also take advantage of the latest in technology. Designs should incorporate lighting, color schemes and surfaces that are colorful and durable. Please click here to continue reading